Brexit Rebellion Hits Record High with 5 Million Signatures and Protests

Anti-brexit protesters on the streets of London
Anti-brexit campaign

British Prime Minister Theresa may have not seen the public flipping the script on her overemphasized No-Brexit Deal.

A massive demonstration in London on Saturday of a reported one million people seeking a new referendum saw a petition asking the British government to revoke article 50 and reconsider its plan to exit the European Union hit over 5 Million signatures as at Sunday.

Demands for a referendum have grown as supporters of a People’s Vote claim it is the sole way out of the current deadlock in Parliament. The Anti-Brexit demonstration is said to be the largest demonstration since protests against the Iraq War in 2003, that led to 96% of the signatures on the petition to be generated solely from the UK.

Organizers of the Put it to the People march claimed one million people showed up for the peaceful procession through the capital. Participants waving EU flags and carrying their placards inked with political messages weaved their way from Hyde Park Corner to Parliament Square as organized. Anti-Brexit placards are placed outside the entrance to the Cabinet Office on Whitehall during the peaceful march.

Conspiracy theories about the petition allude that crashes on the British parliament website since the petition launched on Thursday were a plot to prevent further signatures.

Labour’s deputy leader Tom Watson accused the Prime Minister of having ‘lost control’ of the Brexit process. The mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, supported the petition against Brexit and called for article 50 to be withdrawn.

“It’s time to give us, the British people, a final say on Brexit,” he said.

In 2016, a petition calling for a second referendum should the initial poll not provide a definitive enough result attracted a total of 4,150,260. 5.3 million signing into the petition for article 50 to be withdrawn, stands as the most popular signed petition to have been submitted to the British Parliament website.

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